korraphobia

motherhenna:

anxiouseternally:

micklovich:

this is the single most pretentious thing ive ever seen in my life im gonna vomit

I have never hated John Greene more than I do in this moment 

*sings high praises to the angels for this long-awaited revelation*

transmutes
In Episode 10, we have a six-and-a-half minute seduction/sex scene involving five different characters that is as kinky and subversive and suggestive as any sex scene that you have seen on network television,” he teases. “I would put it as a contender to challenge cable sex scenes — not in terms of the nipple and crack of nakedness — but more in the psychology and sensuality of sex amongst the mad.” But wait, are all five of those people in the same room together? “It depends on how you define room,” replies Fuller, with a chuckle.
Bryan Fuller [x]
(via madsmikkelsennews)
zuko
saucefactory:


queelez:


lord-of-the-nerds:


discordion:


When he was 2 years old, he fell out of a second story window and fractured his skull
When he was 6 years old, he mistakenly drank boric acid.
When he was 9 years old, he fell over a small cliff and broke his leg.
When he was 11 years old, he contracted measles and was in a coma for nine days.
When he was 14 years old, he broke his arm when he caught it in a carriage door.
When he was 19 years old, he was struck on the head by a falling brick.
When he was 23 years old, he almost died from the effects of tainted wine.
When he was 29 years old, Adolph Sax invented the saxophone.


clearly someone didn’t want that saxophone invented 


#incompetent time-travelling saxophone haters


THIS NEEDS TO BE A 300-PAGE SCI-FI NOVEL BECAUSE I WOULD READ THE HELL OUTTA THAT

saucefactory:

queelez:

lord-of-the-nerds:

discordion:

When he was 2 years old, he fell out of a second story window and fractured his skull

When he was 6 years old, he mistakenly drank boric acid.

When he was 9 years old, he fell over a small cliff and broke his leg.

When he was 11 years old, he contracted measles and was in a coma for nine days.

When he was 14 years old, he broke his arm when he caught it in a carriage door.

When he was 19 years old, he was struck on the head by a falling brick.

When he was 23 years old, he almost died from the effects of tainted wine.

When he was 29 years old, Adolph Sax invented the saxophone.

clearly someone didn’t want that saxophone invented 

#incompetent time-travelling saxophone haters

THIS NEEDS TO BE A 300-PAGE SCI-FI NOVEL BECAUSE I WOULD READ THE HELL OUTTA THAT

afro-dominicano
caffeinated-biologist:


Spark, Spark! The Chemistry of Fireworks 
Ever wondered what causes those fancy fiery works of art shine so bright? The science of how fireworks operate is actually simple. And we’ll find out.Pyrotechnics, especially fireworks, operate on a simple theory called combustion. Combustion involves the use of oxygen, that why you can’t light a fire in an airtight setup. It also involves the release of energy, in form of heat and/or light energy.
For a firework to burst into an array of spectacular colors, it must contain the following:
Fuel. Must contain either charcoal or thermite alongside the common blackpowder.
Oxidizing Agents. These produces the oxygen needed to burn the mixture. These are either nitrates, chlorates, or perchlorates.
Reducing Agents. These react with the O2 released by the oxidizing agent/s to produce hot gases, and can also be used to control the speed of the reaction. Sulfur and charcoal are the most common reducing agents used.
Metals. These also control the speed of reaction. Larger surface area = faster reaction rate.
Coloring Agents. They give color to the firework. Strontium (Sr) produces red, Copper (Cu) produces blue, Barium (Ba) produces green, Sodium (Na) for yellow, Calcium (Ca) for orange, and Gold (Au) or Titanium (Ti) for an iron-ish color. These elements when heated, produces excess energy in form of light, and the higher the temperature, the shorter the wavelength.
Binders. These hold the mixture in a paste-like texture. The most commonly used binder is dextrin, though parson is also used.
So, fireworks are actually maelstroms of excess heat energy released by different reactions occurring inside the canister. So as we welcome 2014, let us appreciate these brilliant works of both art and science. Cheers to a new year!
-x
[Source: http://www.ch.ic.ac.uk/local/projects/gondhia/composition.html]

caffeinated-biologist:

Spark, Spark! The Chemistry of Fireworks 

Ever wondered what causes those fancy fiery works of art shine so bright? The science of how fireworks operate is actually simple. And we’ll find out.

Pyrotechnics, especially fireworks, operate on a simple theory called combustion. Combustion involves the use of oxygen, that why you can’t light a fire in an airtight setup. It also involves the release of energy, in form of heat and/or light energy.

For a firework to burst into an array of spectacular colors, it must contain the following:

  1. Fuel. Must contain either charcoal or thermite alongside the common blackpowder.
  2. Oxidizing Agents. These produces the oxygen needed to burn the mixture. These are either nitrates, chlorates, or perchlorates.
  3. Reducing Agents. These react with the O2 released by the oxidizing agent/s to produce hot gases, and can also be used to control the speed of the reaction. Sulfur and charcoal are the most common reducing agents used.
  4. Metals. These also control the speed of reaction. Larger surface area = faster reaction rate.
  5. Coloring Agents. They give color to the firework. Strontium (Sr) produces red, Copper (Cu) produces blue, Barium (Ba) produces green, Sodium (Na) for yellow, Calcium (Ca) for orange, and Gold (Au) or Titanium (Ti) for an iron-ish color. These elements when heated, produces excess energy in form of light, and the higher the temperature, the shorter the wavelength.
  6. Binders. These hold the mixture in a paste-like texture. The most commonly used binder is dextrin, though parson is also used.

So, fireworks are actually maelstroms of excess heat energy released by different reactions occurring inside the canister. So as we welcome 2014, let us appreciate these brilliant works of both art and science. Cheers to a new year!

-x

[Source: http://www.ch.ic.ac.uk/local/projects/gondhia/composition.html]